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Use of anti-mullerian hormone for testing ovarian reserve: a survey of 796 infertility clinics worldwide (Sep 2015)

springer
Title:
Use of anti-mullerian hormone for testing ovarian reserve: a survey of 796 infertility clinics worldwide
Journal:
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, October 2015, Volume 32, Issue 10, pp 1441–1448
Author(s):
Tobler KJ1, Shoham G2, Christianson MS3, Zhao Y3, Leong M4, Shoham Z5,6
Author(s) affiliation:
1Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
2 Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
3 Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4 The Women's Clinic, Hong Kong, SAR, China.
5Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel.
6Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
 

 

Short description:
The aim of this study is to assess how anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is used worldwide to test ovarian reserve and guide in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle management.
Link to the journal
 

 

Abstract taken from PubMed

Purpose:
The aim of this study is to assess how anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is used worldwide to test ovarian reserve and guide in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle management.
Methods:
An internet-based survey was sent electronically to registered IVF providers within the IVF-Worldwide.com network. This survey consisted of nine questions which assessed the clinics' use of AMH. The questionnaire was completed online through the IVF-Worldwide.com website, and quality assurance tools were used to verify that only one survey was completed per clinical IVF center. Results are reported as the proportion of IVF cycles represented by a particular answer choice.
Results:
Survey responses were completed from 796 globally distributed IVF clinics, representing 593,200 IVF cycles worldwide. Sixty percent of the respondent-IVF cycles reported to use AMH as a first line test, and 54 % reported it as the best test for evaluating ovarian reserve. Eighty-nine percent reported that AMH results were extremely relevant or relevant to clinical practice. However in contrast, for predicting live birth rate, 81 % reported age as the best predictor.
Conclusions:
AMH is currently considered a first line test for evaluating ovarian reserve and is considered relevant to clinical practice by the majority of IVF providers.
Link to the paper on PubMed
 




 

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