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Fresh versus Frozen Embryos for Infertility in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (Aug 2016)

nejm
Title:
Fresh versus Frozen Embryos for Infertility in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Journal:
N Engl J Med 2016; 375:523-533|August 11, 2016|DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1513873
Author(s):
Chen ZJ1, Shi Y1, Sun Y1, Zhang B1, Liang X1, Cao Y1, Yang J1, Liu J1, Wei D1, Weng N1, Tian L1, Hao C1, Yang D1, Zhou F1, Shi J1, Xu Y1, Li J1, Yan J1, Qin Y1, Zhao H1, Zhang H1, Legro RS1
Author(s) affiliation:
1From the Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan (Z.-J.C., Y. Shi, D.W., J. Li, J. Yan, Y.Q., H. Zhao), Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Z.-J.C., Y. Sun), and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics (Z.-J.C., Y. Sun), Shanghai, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Maternal and Child Health Hospital in Guangxi, Guangxi (B.Z.), Reproductive Medicine Center, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (X.L.) and Center for Reproductive Medicine, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University (D.Y.), Guangzhou, Center for Reproductive Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei (Y.C.), Center for Reproductive Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan (J. Yang), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (J. Liu), Reproductive Medicine Center of Jinghua Hospital, Shenyang (N.W.), Center for Reproductive Medicine, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang (L.T.), Center for Reproductive Medicine of Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai (C.H.), Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (F.Z.), Assisted Reproduction Center, Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital of Shanxi Province, Xi'an (J.S.), and Center for Reproduction and Genetics, Suzhou Municipal Hospital, Suzhou (Y.X.) - all in China; Department of Biostatistics, Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (H. Zhang); and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey (R.S.L.)
 

 

Short description:
The transfer of fresh embryos is generally preferred over the transfer of frozen embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), but some evidence suggests that frozen-embryo transfer may improve the live-birth rate and lower the rates of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and pregnancy complications in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome.
Link to the journal
 

 

Abstract taken from PubMed

Background:
The transfer of fresh embryos is generally preferred over the transfer of frozen embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), but some evidence suggests that frozen-embryo transfer may improve the live-birth rate and lower the rates of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and pregnancy complications in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome.
Methods:
In this multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 1508 infertile women with the polycystic ovary syndrome who were undergoing their first IVF cycle to undergo either fresh-embryo transfer or embryo cryopreservation followed by frozen-embryo transfer. After 3 days of embryo development, women underwent the transfer of up to two fresh or frozen embryos. The primary outcome was a live birth after the first embryo transfer.
Results:
Frozen-embryo transfer resulted in a higher frequency of live birth after the first transfer than did fresh-embryo transfer (49.3% vs. 42.0%), for a rate ratio of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 1.31; P=0.004). Women who underwent frozen-embryo transfer also had a lower frequency of pregnancy loss (22.0% vs. 32.7%), for a rate ratio of 0.67 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.83; P"<"0.001), and of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (1.3% vs. 7.1%), for a rate ratio of 0.19 (95% CI, 0.10 to 0.37; P"<"0.001), but a higher frequency of preeclampsia (4.4% vs. 1.4%), for a rate ratio of 3.12 (95% CI, 1.26 to 7.73; P=0.009). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of other pregnancy and neonatal complications. There were five neonatal deaths in the frozen-embryo group and none in the fresh-embryo group (P=0.06).
Conclusions:
Among infertile women with the polycystic ovary syndrome, frozen-embryo transfer was associated with a higher rate of live birth, a lower risk of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, and a higher risk of preeclampsia after the first transfer than was fresh-embryo transfer. (Funded by the National Basic Research Program of China and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01841528.)
Link to the paper on PubMed
 




 

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